Sourcey Devil! The Peril Of Outsourcing Freelancers

In the risky, topsy-turvy business of startup companies, it is difficult to acquire the relevant staff with the correct skill set, and many startup companies will tell you that the best approach is to outsource contractors. While there are many detractors of this, you may find that the approach suits you well or it may not. So let’s weigh up the positives and negatives.

The first argument for the case for and against outsourcing is the argument of “distance”. You are able to have a very distant relationship with a freelancer, which is allowing you more time to get on with managing your business. Looking at it from this perspective implies a very “hands-off” approach to managing staff members. This can cause problems for your employees that are permanent fixtures in your company. Plus depending on how you manage a business, it may not be the right fit for you.

The second argument is the word “communication.” In hiring a freelancer that is based on the other side of the world, communication can be somewhat limited. For example, trying to fix an issue at the last minute via email may require a long waiting time because they may not have woken up yet. But with the great freelancer tools that you can access, you are able to find a suitable member of staff on this side of the planet, ensuring better communication when you need it.

The third argument is the word “managing.” Being able to manage a freelancer’s contract is a lot more difficult depending on their location in the world. However, with contracting tools that are more effective, like Exari’s contract management software, you are able to communicate the fine print effectively. Also, looking at it from the perspective of a freelancer if you find that you can work with them on long-term projects, you may wish to fashion a proper contract instead of a freelancer one.

The final argument is the word “relationship.” From permanent members of staff to freelancers, there is a different dynamic in the relationship between the two. From the perspective of a business leader, the way you would cultivate a relationship with a permanent member of staff is entirely different to the approach you would take with a freelancer. The freelancer is effectively a temporary contract, and it could be a long term temporary contract, but it is temporary nonetheless. With a permanent member of staff, you are investing in their personality and their ability to gel with the business. As a result, you would treat them both differently. The freelancer is there to do a task, and once that task is complete, they are sent on their way. But a staff member is a more valuable asset to a company’s future. By looking at both duties individually, you can see where each one has its place. Both are necessary at certain points of a business’ life, and a freelancer may be viewed as a necessary evil or as a fantastic tool to get a task done quickly. Which one is right for you?


Featured Image

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *